Common Choking Hazards in the Summer | First Aid Kit | Dechoker - Dechoker LLC

Resuscitation and Choking: How to Save a Life

August 11, 2022

Resuscitation and Choking: How to Save a Life

We all know that CPR is an important life-saving skill, but did you know that choking is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S.? According to the American Red Cross, more than 10,000 people a year die from choking.

Fortunately, CPR and choking relief are easy to learn and can make the difference between life and death. In this article, we'll cover the basics of both resuscitation and choking relief so that you can be prepared in case of an emergency.

 

CPR Basics

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is  a  lifesaving technique that can be used when someone has stopped breathing or their heart has stopped beating. When performed correctly, CPR can help restart a person's heart and breathing.

CPR is a two-part process that includes chest compressions and rescue breaths. Chest compressions mimic the pumping action of the heart and help to circulate blood throughout the body. Rescue breaths provide oxygen to the lungs and help to keep the victim alive.

To perform CPR on an adult, you will need to:

  1. Call 911 or have someone else call for medical help.
  1. Position the victim on their back on a firm surface. Place your hand on their forehead and tilt their head back slightly. This will open their airway so that you can give them rescue breaths.
  1. Kneel next to the victim's shoulders and place your dominant hand on their chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlace your fingers.
  1. Using your body weight, push straight down in the center of the victim's chest at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. Allow the chest to rise fully between each compression.
  1. After 30 chest compressions, give the victim two rescue breaths. To do this, tilt the victim's head back and pinch their nose shut. Take a deep breath and seal your lips around their mouth. Blow into their mouth for one second, watching to make sure that their chest rises. Give two breaths total.
  1. Repeat steps four and five until medical help arrives or the victim begins to breathe on their own.

CPR for infants and children is similar to CPR for adults, but there are a few key differences. When performing CPR on an infant, you will need to use one hand to provide chest compressions. For children aged one to eight, you can use either one or two hands to provide chest compressions, depending on their size.

It's also important to give rescue breaths more slowly when performing CPR on an infant or child. The American Red Cross recommends giving two rescue breaths that last one second each for infants, and two rescue breaths that last one second longer than normal for children.

 

Choking Relief

Choking occurs when an object gets lodged in the throat or windpipe, blocking the flow of air. Choking is a medical emergency and can be deadly if not treated promptly.

If someone is choking, it's important to act quickly. The first step is to call 911 or have someone else call for medical help. Then, you will need to provide the victim with choking relief.

There are two methods that can be used to provide choking relief: the Heimlich maneuver and abdominal thrusts.

The Heimlich maneuver is a technique that uses sharp, quick bursts of air to dislodge an object from the throat. To perform the Heimlich maneuver on an adult, you will need to:

  1. Stand behind the victim and wrap your arms around their waist.
  1. Make a fist with your dominant hand and place it just above the victim's navel.
  1. Grasp your fist with your other hand and give a quick, upward thrust. Repeat this process until the object is dislodged from the throat.
  1. If the Heimlich maneuver does not work, you can also try abdominal thrusts. To do this, stand behind the victim and place your fists on their lower back, just above their waistline. Then, thrust your fists inward and upward until the object is dislodged from the throat

For infants and children aged one to eight, you will need to perform a modified version of the Heimlich maneuver or abdominal thrusts. For infants, place your palm against their back and give five quick, upward thrusts. For children, place your palm against their back and give five quick, upward abdominal thrusts.

It's also important to be aware of the signs of choking in infants and children. These include:

  • Coughing or gagging
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Inability to cry or make noise
  • Loss of consciousness

If you see any of these signs, it's important to act quickly and provide choking relief.

CPR and choking relief are two vital skills that everyone should know. By learning how to perform CPR and provide choking relief, you could save a life.


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Choking Hazards in the Summer
Choking Hazards in the Summer

July 14, 2022

For many children and families, summer means plenty of fun in the sun. Kids are out of school, hot dogs are on the grill and the drinks are cold. It's a time for fun but it's also a time of vastly increased energy room visits.
Read More
Dechoker’s overwhelming success drives full compliance to FDA requirements.
Dechoker’s overwhelming success drives full compliance to FDA requirements.

October 18, 2021

It’s no surprise that Dechoker’s revolutionary airway clearing device is getting attention. As sales have ramped up so have reported life saves from its device. In the past weekend, the Dechoker team was a buzz with 6 new life saves coming in just three days.
Read More
Major YouTube channel gives high praises to the Dechoker® device.
Major YouTube channel gives high praises to the Dechoker® device.

September 02, 2021

Family Fun Pack is a YouTube vlog about a family of 8, covering everything from daily life to parenting, kids, family vacations and parenting struggles, to fun challenges, clothing hauls, and emergency preparedness...just to name a few. 
Read More